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Teaching Music During School Closures



Teaching music during school closures can be a challenge. Distance learning for group performances, singing, making music together can't be replaced.  Games, activities, videos and project ideas for music remote learning are listed here.  Free downloads too!

Let's face it, nothing can replace a classroom full of music making.  Singing, dancing and playing instruments joyfully together must be experienced authentically in person.  When that isn't possible, what should we do?  I'm afraid I don't have a perfect answer, but I'd like to share a few ideas with you and I hope that you can use them or find that they are a springboard for your own creativity.

Make Music
Incredibox (free on PCs, paid app for tablets and phone) Students can create loops using many different sounds and then share them with you.  Assign THIS free project to have students create music for different movie scenes and email you their mixes through Incredibox.
Isle of Tune - I try not to play with this very often because I lose huge chunks of my life to it.  Free on PC.  Build a town with a musical twist.  Elements like light posts, houses and trees are the sounds and cars drive down the road and "play" the composition.
Play Boomwhackers - Encourage students to notate melodies with crayons or markers.  Write a rhythm using Boomwhacker colors and perform on these digital Boomwhackers.
SING! Mrs. Miracle has some fabulous suggestions to keep your kids singing.


Music Theory
Staff Wars (free on PCs, $ .99 for tablets and phones) Practice pitch names in a seriously cool game.
Music Tech Teacher - games, worksheets and quizzes
Music Games from Plank Road Publishing -high/low, pitch names and more
Compose Your Own Music (Classics for Kids) -drag notes to compose, students can share their composition by emailing you a link.
The Rhythm Trainer - rhythmic dictation.  You pick what note values to use.


Music Games
PBS Music Games
Music Symbols Matching Game


Music History
Learn About Composers (Classics for Kids) - Have students read about a composer of their choosing and write a 5-7 sentence paragraph to summarize what they have learned.  I use THIS template for paragraph writing.
Composer of the Month - A great website with composer biographies and links to biography videos.


YouTube Awesomeness
Carnival of the Animals - Use with this set of listening worksheets.
TVO Music Videos -not YouTube, but a great collection of videos for kids
Short Composer Biographies by Five Minute Mozart
Music Concepts Videos by Music K-8 - I LOVE these videos and so do my students.  They are great for introducing or reinforcing a concept and could be used before a worksheet or assignment.  Concepts include forte/piano, presto/largo, major/minor, etc..  Try this free interactive game about musical opposites from Linda McPherson or these free high/low worksheets by Sara Bibee.


Learn About Instruments
New York Philharmonic KidZone (requires Flash)
Classics for Kids - a variety of fun and engaging activities


Projects
Star Spangled Banner Evaulations -Links and free worksheet.
Build an Instrument -resources from Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Rubber Band Harmonica -It's not a beautiful sound, but it works!
DIY Music Instruments - Several ideas for crafting instruments at home.


Musicals
Netflix, Vudu, Hulu and other streaming services have several musicals that your students might love.  Try out some of the worksheets in this free musicals sampler.  There are complete sets for many musicals in this bundle.

Remember that when posting worksheets for students that you must protect the property of the copyright owner by placing the worksheets in a secure environment.  That means that the files must not be available for the whole Internet to download if they want.  Secure them on your school website with a password or a file service like Dropbox.  Send parents the link and the password.  You can also send the files via email or Google Classroom too.  Students must login to access them this way.


If you liked these ideas, PIN THEM for later!
Teaching music during school closures can be a challenge. Distance learning for group performances, singing, making music together can't be replaced.  Games, activities, videos and project ideas for music remote learning are listed here.  Free downloads too!


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Free Music Workstation Round Up

Music workstation freebies from popular TeachersPayTeachers music teachers.  Make centers come alive with these freebies for your music classroom.

I've rounded up some of my favorite music workstation freebies.  They are from some talented musicians that share their ideas via their blogs and/or Teachers Pay Teachers.  Enjoy!

Note and Rest Duration Chart - It's simple.  It's clean.  It's handy.  I have about 10 laminated copies of  it because I use it all the time!  Check out this freebie from Sara Bibee.

Eighth Note Dancing Raccoon Game - My kiddos love ALL of Linda McPherson's games.  I use them on tablets and on my Smarboard.  So much fun!  And this one is free!

We are Dancing Composition Freebie - Aileen Miracle has so many great ideas for centers.  Check out this blog post for some ideas for creating workstations that make your students composers. Click on the We are Dancing picture to go to the freebie.

Headbandz Some day I am just going to show up at Amy Abbott's classroom and sing and play with her all day!  I love all of her song sets and games.  This freebie is great for a workstation.

10 Games for Rhythm Cards - SO many of these ideas can be used in workstations.  These ideas are from Lindsey Jervis from The Kodaly Inspired Classroom.

American Composers Coloring and Facts Sheets - You probably know Cori Bloom for all of her amazing listening sets, but this freebie is one of my favorite Cori products.  I like to include a worksheet or coloring center in each of my rotations if I can.  I use this one each year.

American Composers Flip Books - When I used these fabulous, free flip books I assembled them for my students and they used their workstation time to research and color the books.  I LOVED the finished product and I bet you will too.  Jena Hudson has done a fabulous job making these books quick and easy to complete.

Beethoven Biography and Worksheet - Bryson at That Music Teacher uses this for his sub tub, but it makes a PERFECT workstation for my 5th graders!  Read a biography and answer some questions.

Station Signs for Music Learning Centers - David Row from Make Moments Matter has a great set of stations signs that you can use to organize your workstation rotations.  Be sure to read this blog post to learn more.

Want MORE freebies?  I have 14 in my store and some are designed for workstations.  Check them out HERE.

Like these ideas?  PIN them for later.

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Books for Women's History Month in the Music Room



I love adding featured books to my classroom library for special months, holidays and events.  Here are a few of my favorite books for Women's History Month:


1.  Beyonce: Shine Your Light
Yep.  A book about Beyonce that is perfect for the elementary music classroom.  This has been a favorite of my students since I added it to our classroom library last year.


2.  Ella Fitzgerald (Little People, Big Dreams)
This book is for lower elementary students and tells the story of Ella Fitzgerald.  I love the illustrations in this book.  It is part of a larger series of books that I would love to have for my daughter.


3.  Dolly Parton: Coat of Many Colors
So, I basically love everything Dolly and this book is delightful!  The illustrations are beautiful and the story of this song is as delightful as the song itself.  I also like THIS book on Dolly for older students.


4.  A Dance Like Starlight:  One Ballerina's Dream
This book is actually fiction but is basically a tribute to Janet Collins, the first ballerina of color to perform at the Metropolitan  Opera.  Love this story!


5.  A Voice Named Aretha
  Aretha Franklin's story is beautifully illustrated in this picture book.  I learned quite a bit about this amazing woman myself from this book!


If you liked these ideas, PIN THEM for later!
Women's History Month books for the music classroom.  Musicians, music teachers and music students will love these stories of great female musicians.


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5 Mistakes You're Making with Workstations

Are you struggling to make music workstations work for you.  Learn about 5 mistakes you may be making and their solutions for your music classroom.

Are your struggling to make workstations work for you?  You could be making some of these mistakes.  Don't worry!  I have some solutions that might work for you.

1.  Planning activities that are finished too soon.  An activity that is too simple means that students will finish right away and then start talking or causing problems.

SOLUTION:  Plan activities that can be repeated until it is time to move to a new station.  If they are completing a worksheet or exit ticket, give them instructions for what to do when they are finished.  For example, when my students finish a worksheet they can turn the paper over and draw a picture or write me a letter.  They love this!

2.  Making too many noisy centers. 
I want my students to have many opportunities to make music, not just learn about music so I have fallen victim to this.  Trust me, it is definitely a loud lesson to learn.

SOLUTION:  Now I like to plan noisy activities in a 1:2 ratio.  One noisy activity to two other quieter activities.  So on a normal workstation day I have 6 stations set up.  Two of those stations would include singing, playing an instrument, etc...

When you set up your stations put those louder stations as far away from each other as is reasonably possible.  I like to set up the stations in opposite corners so that the sound isn't all flowing to the center of the room raising the volume level of the whole room.

3.  Assessing each station.
If they are doing something, it should be assessable, right?  Maybe, but you don't have to take a grade on every single thing you do.  You will just stress yourself out and your students too.

SOLUTION: Plan experiences for your students.  Let them explore, create, arrange, improvise, talk about music, invent and discover.  You don't always have to assess.  When I plan to add an assessment to the rotation of workstations I use a worksheet or another written assignment OR I am a station and students rotate to me and we will do singing games, name games or games.

4.  Planning activities that students can't complete by themselves.
I think my students can do anything!  It turns out that sometimes they need me to keep an activity going, to help them stay on task or to constantly help them review.  As a teacher, it is what I do every day; however, when I plan workstations I need students to be able to work independently or with their small group to complete tasks.

SOLUTION:  When planning your workstations, be sure to think about the variety of learners that will use them.  It is likely that you will have IEP or 504 students that will need accommodations.  Can you record the directions so that students can listen to them?  Can you include materials that help students choose the correct answer?  What are things that you can do to make sure they are successful and independent?

For example, if you have students working on naming pitch names try including a "cheat sheet" that helps students remember those names.  Working on musical math and adding together notes and rests?  Try this sheet by Sara Bibee:  Note and Rest Duration Chart.  Plan ways for students to help themselves.

5.  Not having fun!
I'm not sure who loves workstations more, my students or me!  Workstations allow students time to explore to experience differentiated experiences and to talk about musical experiences with their classmates.

SOLUTIONS:  Consider adding a few more games to your workstations rotations.  If you would have fun completing the activity, so would your students.  Include stations that don't require a ton of setup time.   Check out this list of 99 Workstations You'll Love and be inspired.


Like these ideas?  Pin them for later!
Are you struggling to make music workstations work for you.  Learn about 5 mistakes you may be making and their solutions for your music classroom.

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Light Box Ideas for Music Classrooms


Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!
You may have seen them on Instagram.  Light boxes in classrooms are becoming more common place and are providing teachers with another way to give your students positive messages.  Read on to be inspired to light up your classroom too!

Standard light boxes are about 10×13-1/4×2-1/4.  You can find them in craft stores and discount stores like Walmart and Target.  I love THIS ONE by Heidi Swapp.  Shop around. You can find them on sale at various craft stores and online.  Most light boxes of this size can use the same standard sized letters.
Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!
There are other smaller sizes of light boxes called "minis" and these cute mini light boxes use a smaller letter.  When shopping make sure that your letters will fit into your light box.

I like having a variety of letters in different colors and fonts.  I started with just a couple of different letters and have added a few sets here and there.  You don't need lots of variety to get started.  You can do most messages with just one set.

Now, what kind of messages do you want to use?  I've organized some ideas by month and a few funny ones at the bottom just for teachers!


January

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Sing in the New Year
January Jams
Snow Your Notes
Brrrrrring on the Sing
Snow Place Like Music Class

February

We ❤️ Music
Music Makes My ❤️ Beat
Lift Ev'ry Voice & Sing
You R Music 2 Me

March

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Celebrate Music in Our School
Music is for Everyone
MIOSM celebrates you!
Music is FUNdamental
Lucky Musicians

April


Spring Into Music
Sing In Spring
Music is EGGcellent
Music is for Every Bunny


May

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Hey May! Let's Sing Today!
Sing in Summer
 GR8 Year in Music

August

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Welcome Bach!
Music Class Rocks!
For those about to rock...
Welcome to Music
You R Important
You R a Musician
Musicians Rock
Your Voice is Important

September

Oh Say Can You Sing (birthday of national anthem)
Sunny Days, Sunny Songs

October

Make BOOtiful Music
Sing a Spooky Song
Fall into Music
G8t Musicians? G'Autumn

November

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Thankful for You
Thankful for Music
Time for Turkey Trot
Sing with Thanksgiving
Thankful for a Song 2 Sing

December



Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Any Time Light Box Sayings

Music Rocks
Music is Poetry is Music
#musician
The Rhythm is Gonna Get Ya
Sing Say Dance Play
Boogie Woogie Week
Catch Mallet Madness
Your Voice Matters
Believe in Yourself
Music Matters
Music Makes Me Sing
Music Makes You Sparkle
Make Today Musical

Song Lyrics/Titles

Catch a Falling Star
You Gotta Friend in Me
Rise Up
Don't Worry Be Happy
Don't Stop Believin'
The Sun'll Come Out Tomorrow
Put on a Happy Face
You are My Sunshine
Hakuna Matata
Measure UR Life in Love
Let it Go
Everything is Awesome
UR True Colors R Beautiful


Just for Teachers

Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!



Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!

Want more inspiration?  Follow me on Instagram and see my monthly (mostly!) light box sayings!
If you like these ideas, PIN THEM for later!
Need a little inspiration for what to say on your classroom light box? Look no farther! These sayings are perfect for music classrooms and will be sure to light up the faces of musicians in your classroom. High school, elementary, band or choir...come up. Light it up!
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Create a Music Workstation with an Ornament Organizer

Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.

I am a teacher hoarder.  It is true.  I confess.  Sometimes I buy things because I can imagine a workstation or classroom activity that I'll create with it.  Sometimes I buy things because I am inspired, but haven't quite figured out how to use it yet.   Crazy, right?  This is one of those things that I purchased because I was really inspired and had several ideas right away.  I hope that you'll enjoy using it in your classroom too.

So what was this inspiring thing that I found and purchased right away?  A plastic ornament organizer.  I purchased  one at Walmart and immediately knew that it would be awesome for composing.  It had four rows of four wells.  That sounds like a 16 measure or 16 beat (4 measures) composition to me!

COMPOSING
To create this activity, I purchased some inexpensive ornaments.  I chose the least breakable kind that I could find.  You could also use plastic Easter eggs, ping pong balls, plastic pumpkins, jack-o-lanterns or even flashcards to make it seasonal for other times of the year.  I use this as a workstation. Here's what we do:

Students randomly pull out an ornament and place it anywhere in the container, rhythm side up.  (Some ornaments have 2 sides.  One side is more complex than the other.). Then the group claps the rhythm.  Students continue taking turns until all of the wells have an ornament in them.  Then they clap the entire composition.  If there is time left during their workstation rotation, they can do it again.

With some grade levels, I have them copy their composition down onto paper and turn in.  Other times, they notate it on a 16 box grid using lap packs.  Learn more about lap packs and download a freebie in THIS blog post.

I think this would be a fun center to use to decipher the rhythm of a familiar song.  For the holidays, "Jingle Bells" would be easy.  When creating the rhythms on the ornaments you would need to make sure that you had enough of the required rhythms to make this activity work.


Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.

Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.


MATCHING
Using a 20 well ornament organizer and a new set of ornaments, I created a matching game with music symbols and notes.  I drew the symbol on a small pieces of masking tape and stuck them on the wells.  On the ornaments I wrote the name of the symbol.

Students pull an ornament out of a gift bag and match the name on the ornament with a place in the ornament organizer.  Then they check themselves using a display that I have set up in my room.  You can check out some of the sets HERE.

This would be fun to do with tempo and dynamics terms.  Write the word on the piece of tape or sticker and write the definition on the ornament.

BOUNCE THE RHYTHM
Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.This by far my students' favorite way to use the ornament organizer.  In the bottom of each well in the container, I write a number.  I used 1, 2, 3, 4 and 1/2.  Then I drew each of these notes on a piece of duct tape and placed one each on a tennis ball:  quarter note, half note, dotted half note, whole note and eighth note.

To play, students stand four feet away from the container.  In my classroom this is four floor tiles from the container so it is easy for them to measure.  You could also put a tape line down if you need to.  I rest the container against a wall to provide a bit of stability and keep the balls from flying past the container.

Students hold their hand at their waist and gently bounce the ball so that it lands in the container.  They aim for the number that matches the number of beats of the note on each ball.  FUN!

This would be fun to do with instruments and their families.  Use 20-25 different balls and write the instrument name on them.  Label the container with the instrument families.
Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.

I spoke to my PE teacher about how to make this activity as successful as possible.  She stressed keeping the ball waist high and suggested using a low bounce tennis ball (available at most places that sell them).  Ping pong balls or Nerf balls might make great options too.

I hope that your students enjoy this activity.  Look ornament holders during the Christmas season and the first part of January.  If you liked this idea, PIN it for later!

Learn how to create a variety of music workstations using a plastic Christmas ornament organizer that you can use all year round.  Students can practice identifying music symbols, instrument families, note values and more by gently bouncing a ball or by organizing ornaments!  Fun!  This DIY music room project will impress your music students.




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99 Music Workstations You are Going to Love


A HUGE list of Music Workstations for the elementary music classroom.  You are going to love these center ideas for pitch, rhythm, singing, composing, playing instruments and more.

I love using workstations in my classroom.  I wanted to share a list of some of my favorites, but I think I got a little carried away.  Here are almost 100 workstations that I love with links and explanations.  Enjoy!

Coloring

Color by Note  These activities are fun for students an allow them to show what they know by coloring their answers.  Some of these activities may take more than 10 minutes.
Writing Prompts   Perfect for workstations!  Students write an answer, a paragraph or a story based on the prompts.  Use regular paper or Chrome books and Google Classroom!
Composer Coloring Sheets  Although I often use these while listening to music, they work great in a workstation.  Even the big kids enjoy this!
Primary Writing Prompts   Younger students that may be pre-readers, need to be able to express their ideas with words and pictures.  These primary writing prompts provide space for both.
My Book of Mary Poppins. As a review after we have watched the movie (or portions of it), we color these books that highlight some key items in the movie.
Instrument Coloring Sheet This is probably pretty obvious.  Coloring sheets for instruments or for groups of instruments in their families are great for workstations.
Music Memory Book This is best when used at the end of the school year.  I usually have students work on the books for about half of a class period.  Next class, they finish them as one of the stations that I have set up.
Roll and Cover worksheets  Easy peasy.  Print and set in a workstation with some crayons and some dice.  Actually I use one BIG die and the group shares.  Fun!


Composing

I find that it is really difficult to complete a composing project in the small amount of time that students have in a workstation.  So, instead of doing an entire project, these centers allow students to compose by arranging.  Take a closer look:


Dynamics and Tempo

Candy Corn -Dynamics  This seasonal workstation is simple to do.  Students complete a candy corn puzzle that contains a dynamic term, symbol and definition.  Then, they copy that information to a chart.
A Dab of Music Learning - Dynamics and Symbols  I love dabbers and so do my students!  The set focuses on dynamics and music symbols.  I usually plan 2-3 worksheets for one center.
Dynamics Punch Cards  I have quite a few hand held hole punchers and they come in handy for this station!  Take a closer look by clicking on the link.


Instrument Families

A Dab of Music Learning- Instruments   Another dabber activity set.  This set focuses on instrument families and provides many opportunities for students to show what they know.
Instrument Matching Game  Use pictures of instruments or print this set to use to have students match pictures of instruments with the names of instruments.
Mystery Instruments  One of my favorite activities. I tell students to be sneaky detectives and not tell any other groups what instrument they think is the mystery instrument.  They fill out a "case file" that records the clues they discover. At the one of the center rotations I open the bag and show the class.  Using a different instrument, you could do this many times.
Clip It-Instruments Edition   Just add clothespins to these cards for an engaging workstation that reinforces instrument names and simple rhythm patterns.
Read It, Trace It, Stamp It  This station requires some letter stamps and an ink pad.  Get the washable kind of ink pads.  Trust me.
Dip Tray Family Sort  Using an inexpensive dip tray from the dollar store, this station is a breeze to set up.  Read more about it.
Instrument Coloring Sheets  Use these to reinforce your unit on instrument families.
Instrument Family Punch Cards  Which of these instruments is in the brass family?  Punch your answers with a hole puncher.  Fun assessment.
My Book of Instruments  These take a little bit of time to copy and assemble but are great for small group work or workstations.  Do one family at a time or all instruments at the same time.
Instrument Investigations  This activity takes 15- 20 minutes so you may need to plan a day of longer workstations to make this go well.
Misspelled Instrument Punch Cards  I think it is important that students learn to spell instrument names correctly.  I don't always feel like I have enough time during instruction, so I love adding these punch cards to a workstation rotation.


Movement

Yes!  You can do a movement center!  Set clear expectations and add music (or not) and these activities work so great in stations.  Student love them too.


Non-Pitch Percussion Instruments

Playing instruments is one of my students' favorite workstations and I understand why!  These station sets make playing instruments a pleasant and organized experience.  No, really.d


Pitch

A Dab of Music Learning - Intervals  These dabber activities are great for upper grades.
A Dab of Music Learning -Pitches   Drilling pitch names doesn't have to be boring.  These dabber activities are designed to be completed quickly.  That makes them perfect for workstations.  
Treble Clef Twister  There are many ways to do this, but essentially it requires a staff on the floor.  This could be one that you create with tape, one you already have on a rug or one that you draw on a plain shower curtain.  The link will take you to a sheet that I use as a spinner.
Musical Mneumonics  Another way to drill those pitch names is to have students create their own musical mnemonics.  
Bottle Cap Staff   I have collected hundreds of bottle caps from 2-liters of soda, water bottles, etc...  They make perfect note heads.  Take a closer look to see how it could work in a center.
Bottle Cap Pitch Sort  I also took some of those bottle caps and modge-podged some staves and notes on them.  Students sort them into piles based on their letter name.
Flashcards  - Yeah.  They are boring, but neccessary.  It seems that kids hardly ever use them anymore so maybe they will find them to be a novelty.
Worksheets   I know.  It sounds boring, but these worksheets are attractive and easily completed in the time that students have in a workstation.
Swat the Staff  Create a staff on the wall with tape.  Two students stand next to it, another calls out a letter from the musical alphabet.  The first one to swat the correct line or space wins!
Pitch Match Ups  Basically flashcards, but you match words spelled out by notes on the staff to the words.  Lots of fun designs.
Bop It/Simon Says  Melodic retention.  :-)


Reading

I almost always use my reading area as a stop in the workstation rotation.  Here are some links that might help you out with your reading area.
Classroom Library  Need some ideas for your reading area?  Check out this huge list!
Books for Primary Classes  This is a great list of books that your primary classes will love.
Men and Women of Jazz  Print and laminate the pieces of this bulletin board and include them at a workstation.  They contain short passages and students have time to read more than one during their center rotation.
Meet the Composers  Similar to the Men and Women of Jazz, this bulletin board set can become a reading station too.
Magazines - Do you subscribe to Music Alive or Music Express?  Leave a few copies in a crate and set it in the floor.  Instant workstation!


Rhythm

A Dab of Music Learning - Rhythm  Dab.  Dab. Dab dab dab.  Note values, musical math and more in this set.
Drawing Notes-lap packs  This link takes you to a blog post about Lap Packs.  I've used them with Kindergarten through high school.  For the littles, it is a great way to practice drawing notes.
Swat the Rhythm  We like swatting things in my classroom.  The link takes you to a few sets that I have created.  You can do the same activity with flashcards.  Lay them on the floor.  One student claps a rhythm that is on one of the cards.  The first student to swat the right answer, wins a point.  
Rhythm Blocks  Duplos and legos make great music workstations!  Check out this blog post to learn more.
Craft Stick Rhythms - Take craft sticks and use them to make quarter notes and barred eighth notes.  Students clap their "compositions" and then make more.
Roll and Cover  Roll and cover activities allow students to reinforce their knowledge of note names.
Musical Yahtzee  From Layton Music, this activity is great for small groups or workstations.  I laminate the score sheets when using them in workstations and add some music dice.  
Noodle Notes. I love pool noodles!  Learn about how to create noodle notes in this blog post.
Caterpillar Rhythms   Construction paper circles or paper plates become caterpillar bodies in this activity.  Add rhythm patterns or single notes on them and students build a caterpillar pattern.  The longer, the better!
Play Dough Mats  Laminate and just add play dough.  Students learn about notes and symbols through play.
Don't Break the Ice -take a Don't Break the Ice game and draw different notes on each block (quarter, half, barred eighths, 4 16ths, etc....).  Create a spinner with whatever note values you used.  Students spin and the tap out one block with that note on it until somebody breaks the ice.
Add it Up Rhythm Cards  Musical math!  This freebie can be used in many ways.
Note Value Punch Cards  This is another activity for hole punchers that can assess student knowledge.
Rap It Clap It Music Match It  This is an old faithful workstation for me.  Students match the syllables of themed words to simple rhythm patterns.  Perfect for a workstation.  I often do this activity with the whole group and use it in a workstation later.
Clip It Games  Clip it games require students to match words with a rhythm pattern that most closely matches its
Rhythm Pins w/Paint Chips  Cut the paint chips so that there are 4 boxes on them.  Draw single beat notes or rhythms on clothespins.  Students pin a measure on the paint chips, clap and repeat.
Candy Land (note differentiating)  Instead of using Candy Land for just color recognition, add music symbols, notes, pitches, etc... to the colors.  Fun!
Musical Jenga - Check out this awesome idea from the Music K-8 Idea Bank for creating a musical Jenga game.
Tracing Sheets  Get acquainted with notes and their values with these tracing sheets.  Great for younger learners.
Music Math Houses   I laminate these and use dry erase markers.  Students add up all of the musical math problems in colorful houses and check their own answers.
Note Knacks. These are great!  I have one student create a four beat measure and the others recreate it with the Note Knacks.  They are a little pricey, but worth it.
Dot Composing  This is a simplified way to compose using quarter notes, barred eighths or 4 16th notes.  Read more about it in this blog post.
Rhythm Blocks  Kelly Parrish from Rhythmically Yours makes these amazing rhythm blocks.  I use them for rhythmic dictation.  At a workstation, one student secretly creates a rhythm pattern and then claps it for their group.  The other students recreate that with their rhythm blocks.
Poison Rhythms. Using a lap top or table, I have students play poison rhythm just they way we do as a whole group.  FUN!  The link will take you to several different versions.


Vocal Stations

Vocal Explorations  -Vocalizations are a few workstation and let students be a little silly and creative.
Puppets and Books  Use puppets and some Wee Sing books at a station.  The goal?  SING!
Sticky Note Singing   Take a song that you are working to have memorized.  Cover part of it with a sticky note and try singing it.  Add another and try again.  Let your neighbor add the next one and try again.  It is a fun way to work on memorization and to get students singing at their center.
ABC Chart   This one is easy peasy to create.  Check out the blog post for a simple description of this activity.
Singing Sticks from Music Mom  These little singing sticks are great tools to reinforce Solfege or at my school to reinforce the pitch numbers of a major scale.  After using them with classes for a while, they can easily practice in workstation groups to sing patterns.
Singing Rocks   I love my singing rocks!  They really allow for improvisation and creativity.  After I have modeled this activity in class, students are able to do it in a workstation.  It is great to listen to them sing their imaginations out!
Blob Chorus - Ear Training  This is an app that is so fun that students don't realize they are learning!  Hurray!

STEAM

Xyloba   Engineer a marble run that plays a song with this awesome set!
Found Sounds  Collect some junk.  Put it in a box.  Let students become detectives, inventors and musicians.
Stikbot Animation  Animate a dance.  Choreography and green screen technology can create some amazing videos.
Spec Drums  There are so many ways to use Spec Drums in workstations:  exploration, composition, practicing simple folk songs and more!
Ozobots   Code these little robots to show the tempo changes of a piece of music.  Use the workstation time to have them practice creating paths that change speeds (or tempos!).
Makey Makey   My students always fight to be the first group at this station.  I add the instructions, a Makey Makey invention set and some random things for students to experiment with like fruit, play dough, hot dogs...whatever.  Students use these items to play a keyboard or drum on the computer.  I definitely recommend this activity!


Apps

There are SO many great music apps out there.  Here are a few that I think work really well in workstations.


Miscellaneous

Music Interest Inventory Punch Cards   This is a fun addition to workstation rotations at the beginning of the school year.  You can learn a great deal about your students.
Talk About Tunes   I mean, they are going to talk anyway.  Why not make it musical?
Carnival of the Animals  -Use a day of workstations to review Carnival of the Animals.
Peter and the Wolf - This set lets you expand your Peter and the Wolf unit in some fun and creative ways.
Star Spangled Banner   I use this every singing year with 3rd or 4th grade.  It is a great way to learn more about our national anthem, help students memorize it, learn the vocabulary and more.  I always plan a couple of class periods to do all of the stations in this kit.


Whew!  What a list!  If you loved these ideas, PIN THIS for later!
A HUGE list of Music Workstations for the elementary music classroom.  You are going to love these center ideas for pitch, rhythm, singing, composing, playing instruments and more.



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