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Poison Rhythms


Poison Rhythm is one of my favorite rhythm activities ever.  Students are so completely engaged.  They will read and perform dozens of patterns over and over without complaint.  Read on to learn more about this exciting game.

How to play poison rhythm:

  1.  Choose a poison rhythm and write it on the board.
  2. Have students practice this pattern by clapping and saying it several times.
  3. Explain that once the game starts that they can’t clap or say this rhythm.  If they do YOU get a point.  If no one in the class claps or says the poison rhythm, the class gets a point.
  4. Erase the rhythm and either show flashcards (that have a few copies of that rhythm in it) or clap the rhythm and let them decide from just listening while you echo.

I decided that using the flashcards was cumbersome, so I created a digital version.  That was SO much easier.  The play is pretty much the same except the PDF walks you through the beginning steps and there’s a theme for each set of games.  

Take a look at this video to see how I introduce/review this game with a class:


There are MANY variations to this game.  You can do a quick search on Facebook or Google to see the variations.


Instead of just clapping the rhythms, I like to mix it up.  Sometimes we will use buckets and drum sticks, tubanos, other non-pitched percussion instruments, Boomwhackers and sometimes we turn our chairs around backwards, sit facing the screen and use drumsticks on the back of our chairs. AWESOME!

If you are interested in using my digital versions (that you could also print if you wanted) take a look here:  Poison Rhythms.




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Rhythm Cards for Rockin' Repetition


Use these simple rhythm cards to establish routine and improve rhythm and steady beat skills in your music classroom.  In music education the simplest ideas are the best. Your students will thank you for adding this activity to your music routine.


I love creating a routine at the beginning of my classes.  It helps students focus and gives me a second to handle questions and get things ready to go.  For some classes this is a hello song, echo clapping or a movement activity.  In this post I'll share one of my favorites.  Rhythm cards are the perfect way to get students thinking and moving in music class.

The rhythm cards that I am referring to have 4 beats worth of notation.  I copy the same card on front and back so that they are easier to use. One card has 4 quarter notes.  Another has two half notes and so on.

When using these cards I am reinforcing note values and sharpening skills that we will use in other activities to compose rhythmic ostinatos or melodies.  Students are able to feel the duration and this makes a strong connection.  Using this activity at the beginning of each or during each class for several weeks in a row has been a great skill builder!  I like to call it "rockin' repetition".

Use these simple rhythm cards to establish routine and improve rhythm and steady beat skills in your music classroom.  In music education the simplest ideas are the best. Your students will thank you for adding this activity to your music routine.


I wish this simple but brilliant idea was mine, but I actually learned about it from Kristin Lukow, music educator extraordinaire on the Music K-8 discussion list.  I've incorporated it into lessons for many years now and my students are better for it.  Thanks Kristin!

Here's what I do:
I choose a song with a medium to fast beat (which are much easier than slower songs) and start it as students are walking into music class.  They clap the pattern as an ostinato until I change the card.  That's really it!

Use these simple rhythm cards to establish routine and improve rhythm and steady beat skills in your music classroom.  In music education the simplest ideas are the best. Your students will thank you for adding this activity to your music routine.


This activity works great with my drums, classroom percussion instruments and different kinds of body percussion instead of just clapping.  Often we will do this with tennis balls or basketballs (if I can borrow some).  When we use balls with the cards here are the movements:

whole notes - count as you move it around your waist, back and then to your front.  Think of it as traveling around the world.
half notes - bounce so that the first part of the note is when the ball hits the floor and the second is when you catch it
quarter notes -same as half note but on each beat.  It helps to be closer to the floor for this one.
eighth notes-hot potato!  We pass it from hand to hand in rhythm.

Since this activity is used many times during the school year my play list is pretty diverse and always growing.  I include songs that I'll use with tennis balls, basketballs and with body percussion.  I can choose faster pieces for body percussion than the others.  Some student favorites:

"Can't Stop This Feeling" by Justin Timberlake
"Song of the South" by Alabama
"The Star and Stripes Forever" Sousa
"Best Years of Our Lives" by the Baha Men
"I Love a Rainy Night" by Eddie Rabbit

You can check out my entire playlist for rhythm cards here:  Rhythm Cards Playlist on Amazon Music.

I know this is a simple idea, but once you've implemented it I think that you'll find it  is helpful not only for establishing routine, but for improving rhythm skills and steady beat with your students.  I'm so sure it will that I want you to have a copy of the cards for free!  Print out two copies and laminate the same pattern back to back.  Get the cards here: Rhythm Cards for Rockin' Repetition




Use these simple rhythm cards to establish routine and improve rhythm and steady beat skills in your music classroom.  In music education the simplest ideas are the best. Your students will thank you for adding this activity to your music routine.




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Pass the Chicken - A Game for Reviewing Anything

Looking for a quick and easy review game? Try Pass the Chicken! Great for any classroom, this blog post shows you how to play the game and gives you a free list of music themed categories to use. FUN for music class or any classroom.

Pass the chicken is one of my go to games when I need to review something or even when I just have a few spare minutes with a group.

Here's how to play:
1.Have your class stand in a circle.
2.One student holds the rubber chicken (or whatever object you want to pass).  
3.You say one of the categories from the included list.  
4.The student immediately pass the chicken to the left and the others continue to pass it as the one who was it says five things that fit the category.
5.If they name 5 whoever has the chicken when they finish is the next person who is it.  If they don’t, they have to come to the center of the circle and do the ”Chicken Dance”.  
6.They hand the chicken to the person on their left who is now it.  The play repeats.

When we are reviewing instrument families my categories for the game might be:
Brass Instruments
Percussion Instruments
Instruments with strings
Instruments that start with T
Instruments that have a reed

Sometimes I've planned a lesson that doesn't take as long as I think it will.  Other times I'm stuck with a group waiting for their teacher to pick them up.  Pass the Chicken is a great way to see what they know and keep them focused.  I keep a list of different musical topics near my desk so that I can refer to it when I can't come up with any ideas.




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Looking for a quick and easy review game? Try Pass the Chicken! Great for any classroom, this blog post shows you how to play the game and gives you a free list of music themed categories to use. FUN for music class or any classroom.



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New Year's Resolutions for Teachers

New Year's resolutions for teachers.  You'll laugh.  You'll cry.  You probably won't resolve to do anything with this list of sassy ideas for educators.

I will try to drink more water each day and stop calling my early morning soda my “coffee”.
My bus room kids think that me calling my diet orange Sunkist "coffee" is hilarious.  Little do they know, it is the only thing keeping me from crawling under my desk until the bell rings and they leave me in silence to wake up.  So, perhaps after my first "coffee" of the morning I'll try a little water.  Probably.


I will remember that I really do love kids even when after teaching in a swamp of germs and disease I have my 5th cold of the year.
I do love kids.  I do.  I hate being sick.  I really do.

When taking notes in a staff meeting I will stop making a list of things the speaker says that could be taken in a naughty way.
This one may be the toughest one yet!  I mean when someone says "We just need to come in from behind." or "It's just bigger than we expected."  Don't you automatically put the phrase "that's what she said" in there?  Oh no!  Have I been binge watching too much of The Office?

I will stop freaking out every time the school wifi goes down and instead use it as a time to go class old school with my lessons. 
Old school as in, let's play Red Rover cause my lesson plan is just over.

I will stop telling people that the men’s restroom is actually the Poop Bathroom for men or women.
Yeah.  I do this.  In my building there are like 3 men and 47,987 women.  So, it is just a courtesy to most of the staff to tell everyone to use the men's bathroom when they have to poop, right?  What's funnier than that is telling those guys that I'm telling people that.  Bwahahahaha.  I don't even know if people do it.  It just makes me giggle.  

I will try other organizational techniques than shoving things in my drawers and that one scary cabinet at the back of my room.
I bet I could supply a first year teacher with everything he would need from the awesome stuff that I have shoved in my cabinet and forgotten. Oooo!  Maybe that's how I get it cleaned up.  I should totally "gift" it to a new teacher!

I will stop cramming tons of stuff in my teacher bag and taking it home to do every night and then feeling guilty when I watch TV instead.
I think that instead, I'll just leave it all on my desk and feel guilty anyway.  Same great guilt.  Much less work.

I will stop googling “what other jobs can you do with a teaching degree” every time grades are due.
Seriously....why do I wait until the last minute to get the last few sets of grades in?  Please tell me I'm not the only one.

I will not judge myself or others by the perfection, originality and creativity of their bulletin boards.
I rarely do this, because I change my boards so often that I don't have time to look at other people's displays.  It's really a sickness I have.  I change them at least once a month.  Sometimes more.  Hello.  My name is Tracy and I may have an unhealthy relationship with bulletin boards.

I will talk to more adults about things that are not school related.
This is hard because most of the adults I talk to ARE school related.  There should be a friend matchmaking website that connects teachers to non-teachers just so we can widen our friend circle.    

I will remember that I have the greatest job in the world.
This one is easy because I DO have the greatest job in the world.  I get to be an ambassador of joy and instill the love and appreciation of music in the lives of my students every day.  


Remember these for next year by PINNING them!
New Year's resolutions for teachers.  You'll laugh.  You'll cry.  You probably won't resolve to do anything with this list of sassy ideas for educators.

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26 Things Music Teachers are Thankful For

Things Music Teachers are Thankful for...hearing that song your students are singing in the bathroom, music education victories, a drawer full of chocolate.  Be thankful music educator!  You've got a great job.


1.  Hearing a song you've taught a class, ringing out of the student bathroom as you pass by.

2.  An email that says "My son/daughter has never taken an interest in music, but I think you have inspired them to take up a new hobby."

3.  Boomwhackers, arranged in perfect order and hanging on the wall.

4. That rush of pride and relief that comes after a performance.

5.  Comfy shoes and a drawer full of chocolate.

6. The technology working just as it is supposed to.

7.  Supportive administrators.

8.  Spouses who totally get concert week.

9.  Being tagged in a favorite teachers post on Facebook.

10.  Perfect attendance at after school choir.

11.  That one second in recorder class when everyone rests at the same time and your soul knows a moment of peace.

12.  The parade of the birthday cupcakes, donuts, snack cake and other goodies during the last hour of the day.

13.  Classroom teachers that accept you as part of the team, not a babysitter during their break.

14.  The smooth, clean feel of a brand new tubano.

15.  Artie Almeida.

16.  Pool noodle ponies standing neatly in their "stall" waiting for the next class.

17.  Finishing a folk dance with students that rolled their eyes and moaned in disgust before, but now are flushed and happy and saying things like "That was so much fun!"

18.  Teachers Pay Teachers.

19.  Food Fridays in the teachers' lounge.

20.  Kids who laugh at my jokes.

21.  Friends and family that have to listen to me talk about my classroom and students non-stop.

22.  Thunderous applause.

23.  Being a witness to music bringing people together.

24.  Although many of us would like to see our students more often than we do, we are also pretty darn thankful that we see SOME classes once a week for less than an hour.

25.  Beautiful, colorful bulletin boards hanging perfectly on the wall.

26.  We have the best job in the whole world.  We make a difference in the lives of students every day and are often the only ambassadors of joy they see each week.

Let me know what you are thankful for in the comments!  Like this post?  PIN it for later.

Things Music Teachers are Thankful for...hearing that song your students are singing in the bathroom, music education victories, a drawer full of chocolate.  Be thankful music educator!  You've got a great job.

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Music Teacher Pet Peeves

Music Teacher Pet Peeves is a list of relatable situations and conversations that modern music educators find themselves in.  Don't worry music teachers!  You are not alone.

This blog post was written to let music teachers everywhere know that they are not alone.  It seems that we are always having to justify why the study of music has merit, defend our class times and handle the same student issues over and over.  Here are just a few of music teacher pet peeves I have experienced or that music teaching friends have experienced.

I can't come to the concert because I have sports practice.
Practice?  Not a semi-final championship?  Not even a game...just practice?  This is frustrating.  The concert happens one time a year.  One time.

It's Moat-zart not Mo-zart.
I have modeled this correctly time and time again.  Why?  Why say it incorrectly?  Argh!

No gum.  Anytime.
This one is probably just a personal pet peeve, but we are going sing and you don't need gum in your mouth to do that.  If we are playing instruments, I don't want any gum in or on them.  Weirder things have happened.  Just don't do it.  Spit out your gum or better yet, just don't chew it at school.

Little Johnny is behind in math, can he skip music today?
So that he can become behind in music?  I get 50 minutes one time a week to teach a year's worth of curriculum.  I need every single one of those minute and so does little Johnny.

Is this for a grade?
Bwahahaha.  No, dude.  This is pretty much like recess but with drums. *rolling eyes*
Of course this is for a grade.

Sorry we are late.  It is just so important that we get every single minute of reading in that we can.
This is complete disrespect for my time and my job.  What happens in your room is not more important that what happens in mine.  It may be tested more than my curriculum, but it is not more important.

I understand if once in a blue moon you run late, or forget to give a spelling test because it is party day or whatever, but if this is a regular thing, it is a regular problem.

Somebody farted.  I must roll around clutching my nose, flopping around like I have inhaled poison until the whole class is in complete and utter chaos.
You've smelled bad things.  This isn't theater class.  Let's move on.

P.S.  Okay.  Okay.  I've had a few of these that we actually had to stop what we were doing because we all thought we might die, but usually...we can just move on.

Are you a real teacher?
Seriously?  I have more credit hours with my Bachelor's degree than most classroom teachers have with their Masters.  I have dual certification in both K-12 instrumental music and K-12 vocal music.  I see up to 30 different classes a week with individual lesson plans all the while maintaining accommodations for IEPs and 504s.  I cram all of my yearly objectives into one class period a week.  I do this while preparing concerts where I am judged for 60 minutes of "show" instead of the hours of teaching I do every day.  It's like a big public report card.

I am not just a "real" teacher.  I am a frickin' rock star.

Let me know if one of these is also one of your pet peeves.  What other things make you a little crazy (vanishing pencils, observations the day before Christmas vacation, hearing the word "li-berry" instead of library)?


Pin this post to read again!
Music Teacher Pet Peeves is a list of relatable situations and conversations that modern music educators find themselves in.  Don't worry music teachers!  You are not alone.


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Sub Plans for the Non-Musical Sub

Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.

It happens.  A kid gets sick.  Your car breaks down.  You are suddenly called to go out of town.  The flu wraps its icy fingers around you.  You need a sub.

As a music teacher, I can't always count on getting a musical substitute teacher.  Actually I have only rarely had a sub that was comfortable doing musical activities like singing, dancing or playing instruments.  Due to this fact, I have created a sub tub with activities that even a non-musical sub would be comfortable teaching.

Currently I am teaching 3rd, 4th and 5th grades but I have used this system with K-8 quite successfully.  I organize all of my instructions for the substitute teacher in a binder.  Here are some of the things that are helpful to include:
  • Where to find things like the attendance book, seating charts, office supplies, bandages, hall passes, nurse passes, etc...
  • Procedures for emergencies.  If your school uses code words or special signals, be sure to include those in your plans.
  • Instructions for using technology in your room and any passwords that they will need.
  • A list of helpful teachers and where to find them.
  • A picture or drawing of how you set your room up.
  • An explanation of how to follow your emergency plans if no other plans are left.
  • General rules for the music room.  I have flexible seating choices in my room but I only use them for workstations or movie days, so I want to let them know how I use them.
  • Change for the soda machine. 
This is the first thing a guest teacher to my classroom needs to read to get acquainted with the music room and how their day will go. 

The sub plan binder also contains several different lesson plans for each grade.  These plans include a list of what they will need, where it is, what to do and a tracking sheet that I ask them to fill out so that I know what they have done and with which classes.  Keep reading to find out how to get these starter files for free!
Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.

When I return from an absence I can quickly browse through the binder and see what students have done.

The binder refers to materials in the sub tub.  These materials are either videos (some with worksheets, some without), worksheets or activities with children's books.  

Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.


Videos
Here are some videos that I recommend for the sub tub:

Kindergarten and 1st Grade:
Wee Sing Train
Wee Sing King Cole's Party
Wee Sing Big Rock Candy Mountain

2nd Grade:
Wee Sing in Sillyville
Wee Sing Marvelous Musical Mansion
Tubby the Tuba
3rd Grade:
Wee Sing Marvelous Musical Mansion
Overture to Disaster
Music and Heroes of America
Julie's Green Room (on Netflix)

4th and 5th Grades:
Stomp Out Loud
Composer's Specials (Bach, Bizet, Liszt, Strauss, Rossini, Handel)
Beethoven Lives Upstairs


Videos with Worksheets
I have created several resources that you might find valuable for your sub tub.  They are all actually bundled up in one bundle in my store (or you can purchase them individually).  Check out this Musicals Mega Bundle which includes tons of resources for these musicals:



Worksheets
I'm not a big fan of worksheets, but they do have their purpose and place in music class.  For substitute teachers they are often a familiar and comfortable activity that they can be successful with.  In my sub tub I use worksheets that reinforce skills we are constantly working on like note values, pitch names, composition and instrument identification and classification.

I pull those worksheets from the same sets that I have posted in my store.  They come in a bundle (that continues to grow) or you can buy the sets individually.  There are more than 400 usable pages in the bundle.  You can get it here:  No Prep Music Worksheets Endless Growing Bundle

Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.

Activities with Children's Books
Like many elementary music teachers I LOVE teaching with children's picture books.  I have dozens of books that I use regularly and some that work really well with substitute teacher lesson plans.

The Remarkable Farkle McBride by John Lithgow
This is such a fun story!  I have students complete a writing prompt that asks them to draw and write about an instrument they might like to play.  This book is also a great time to talk about onomatopoeias so we take time to write down some musical onomatopoeias.

The Word Collector by Peter H. Reynolds
This book is relatively new to my collection.  It's a delightful story about a boy who collects words.  After the story, students go on a word hunt around the music room to collect words.  This is also a great time to use some of the syllable search worksheets from my worksheet collections.
Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.
Tubby the Tuba by Paul Tripp
This is such a wonderful story!  In recent years I have stopped showing the movie very often.  It feels like it is 4 hours long.  The book, however, is delightful and not four hours long.  Subs love this lesson too!  After the story, I leave some discussion questions and a color the orchestra worksheet (color by instrument family) and a word search.

Moses Goes to a Concert by Isaac Millman
Another sub favorite is Moses Goes to a Concert.  This book talks about the experiences of a deaf student that goes to hear an orchestra perform.  The percussionist in the orchestra is also deaf and helps the students experience the music through vibrations.  With this book I leave a listening comprehension worksheet and a copy of the ASL alphabet.  After the worksheet questions have been answered and discussed, students can use the alphabet sheet to practice their names.  There are also TONS of YouTube videos of people signing popular songs that students love to watch.

The Rocket's Red Glare by Peter Alderman
This book tells the story of the "Star-Spangled Banner".  Although there are several books out there, this one has such beautiful illustrations that it is quickly becoming my favorite.  For sub plans, I have the teacher read the book, discuss the etiquette that we should display during the national anthem and then listen to the version that comes with the book.  After that, students receive sheets that are mostly blank with the exception of one of the phrases of the the "Star-Spangled Banner".  Students are then challenged to illustrate their phrase.  When they are finished it makes a beautiful display for the hallway or a bulletin board.

I have all of my children's literature sub plans bundled in my store.  Included are the ISBN numbers for the books, links to any pertinent videos to show as time fillers and all of the worksheets and activities listed about.  Get it here:  Sub Plans for the Non-Musical Sub

You might also like to watch this replay of a Facebook Live video where I take you on a tour of my sub binder and sub tub resources.





Ready to build your sub binder and Sub Tub?  Download these free starter files:  Sub Plan Starter Files

Like these ideas?  PIN them for later!
Music teachers often need to leave sub plans for non-musical substitute teachers.  This post is filled with tried and true lesson plans that are practical and comfortable for any teacher that steps into the music classroom.  Children's books, videos, worksheets and more are discussed.


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Classroom Tour 2018 - Jedi Musicians

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

I've been waiting for years to do this theme in my classroom.  My only regret is that my Star Wars loving husband isn't here to see it.  I think he would be proud!  This year's theme is Jedi Musicians.  Let me take you on a walk through of my room.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
This is the front view of my classroom and what the students look at most of the time they are in their chairs.  My instrument storage is easily accessible and they can easily see two character education bulletin boards and my awesome Millenium Falcon rug.  The large message across the front of the room is a bonus in the Jedi Musicians bundle.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
This is a closer view of the Be a Kindness Trooper bulletin board.  You can snag it here.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
Jedi Mindset bulletin board.  You can download it here.
Growth mindset is something that I have encouraged in my classroom way before it was a trendy buzzword.  It is important to make students feel that my classroom is one that is safe to make mistakes in and that the voice in their head is the most important one they will ever hear.  This year I decided to present this in a dark side/light side.  My students LOVE it!
Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
This view is of the corner of my classroom.  I store my Orff instruments, Boomwhackers and some miscellaneous things (pBuzz and steady beat swords).  The poster on the left is a painting that my son did.  He is so talented!  The song lyric posters are positive messages to me and my students.  They sit on the wall just opposite of my desk so I see them all the time.  You can get them HERE if you are interested.
Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

I keep a display of common tempo and dynamics terms as a reference during the school year.
Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

I also love to keep something up all year that reminds students of ensemble names and sizes.  We refer to this during listening lessons all year.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
Although the picture above looks like a word wall, it is actually my instrument family display.  I like being able to sort them into families in this way and love that it doesn't take up too much space.  This is at the back of my room because later in the year my third graders will take some quizzes on them and it is easier to cover up there.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
This is the back of my room.  I have one long bulletin board that I divide into several sections.  The board on the far left is my treble clef lines and spaces display.  The board on the right will be my Song of the Month display and the one in the middle will be changed out monthly.  These groovy borders are all from Creative Teaching Press.   
The shelves house textbooks I rarely use.  Under the table are foot stools that I use for flexible seating and to put glockenspiels on when we play them.  This makes it much more comfortable for students to play.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

This area contains a funny picture from Tone Def Comics about Jedis and Conductors.  Love it!  The Leia and Han Solo people were actually left from my farmhouse theme last year.  I just made them a little Star Warsy (is that a word?).  We don't use them as actual bathroom passes (because...uhm...gross) but they hang near the area where students sign out to leave the room.

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.
This is my favorite corner!  This is my reading area.  I will use these each time we do stations.  There are books in baskets on each side of the bookshelf and students are sure to be comfy with the pillows and R2-D2 rug.  Heck, I might curl up there during my planning time!

Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.

My desk.  I kept the faux wood contact paper I put up last year and added these Star Wars inspired letters from Aisnes Creations.  I have a cozy footstool from Five Below under my desk.

If you are interested in using the Jedi Musicians theme, you can find it exclusively on thebulletinboardlady.com

If you  like these ideas, PIN THEM for later.
Star Wars classroom inspiration can be found in this blog post crammed with pictures.  Classroom organization, decorations and more are included. The force is strong in this music classroom.  Be inspired.


Wanna see a video walk-through?  This Facebook Live has been archived for your enjoyment:

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